Advanced Materials and Micromechanics Laboratory
University of Wisconsin
Researchers
Students, collaborators and friends
Rod Lakes Home
Negative Poisson's ratio   Viscoelasticity   Cosserat solids   Biomechanics   Industrial research
  We are interested in materials with heterogeneous structure, including synthetic composites and polymer lattices and cellular solids as well as natural composites such as bone, ligament, and wood. We investigate the freedom of natural and synthesized materials to behave in ways not anticipated in elementary continuum representations, and to attain physical properties of much higher magnitude than anticipated from standard theories. The first designed 3D negative Poisson's ratio materials were made in our laboratory. Composites have been developed in which the composite stiffness is greater than the stiffness of any constituent in the composite. Lattice materials have been made with tunable thermal expansion over a wide range. The first 2D and 3D chiral elastic lattice materials were made in our laboratory. Viscoelastic materials are of particular interest as high performance damping materials and as materials which undergo creep in industrial settings. We determine viscoelastic properties over eleven orders of magnitude of frequency, with no need for temperature shifts.
  A major theme of research in our laboratory is the creation and characterization of materials with extreme and unusual physical properties. We have developed materials with reversed properties, including negative Poisson's ratio, negative stiffness, and negative thermal expansion; also materials with chiral asymmetry and controlled thermal expansion.
We continue the development and study of lattice metamaterials.
  We pursue basic research as well as applied research for industry.
We thank the National Science Foundation, DARPA, various industries, and the Department of Agriculture for support.








group 1, group 1a, group 5, group 15lg, group 612, group 9, laser green




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